Jew in a Blog

66 notes

The only Hebrew version of the perennially popular Arthurian legends was written in northern Italy in 1279. […] The 13th-century Italian Jewish translator’s literary methods are as fascinating as are the Arthurian stories in Hebrew dress. The scribe not only translates from Italian, [..] he also changed and Judaized the story. The scribe’s manner of Judaization is evident at the outset of the romance; the apology itself is filled with terms from a familiar Jewish world.

Instrumental to the Judaization of the Arthurian romance are the scribe’s choice of plot (the seduction of Igerne by the king, with its parallels to the David-Bath-Sheba story), additions and omissions, use of language, and treatment of certain passages to stress Jewish ideas. For instance, the feast at which Uther meets Igerne is described in the Old French sources as a Christmas feast. In the Hebrew version, the statement “Then the king made a great feast for all the people and all the princes” (based on Esth. 2:18) conveys the aura of a Purim feast.

Another example of such transference of concepts occurs when the translator takes the talmudic word tamḥui (“a charity bowl from which food was distributed to the needy”), with its uniquely Jewish associations, to describe the grail, an overtly Christian symbol. The constant use of well-known biblical phrases reminds the reader of religious literature and produces the effect of biblical scenes in the midst of the Arthurian narrative. In this fashion, then, the text and the language interact in polyphonic fashion.

Jewish Virtual Library |  King Artus: A Hebrew Arthurian Romance of 1279 (via bors-of-gaunis)

Reminds me of the Bovo Buch

(via fuckyeahsoftzionism)

so weird literally just yesterday read this chapter in this new book i got (Radiant Days, Haunted Nights: Great Tales From the Treasury of Yiddish Folk Literature) :  

Anonymous Arthurian Legend (1789)

"The stories about King Arthur’s Court, Celtic in origin and widespread in medieval European culture, made their way into Yiddish literature chiefly via German, whereby the German texts might have been recited or chanted to the Yiddish authors, who could not necessarily read the Latin alphabet. In any event, the magic and derring-do of the celebrated king and his knights provided the most widely read literary entertainment among Ashkenazi Jews, far outdoing even the wildly popular Bovo Book. King Arthur is called Artus in German and Artis or Artur in Yiddish. “

(via maximilianofmexico)

dang, did not know that. i wonder why, then, the Bovo Book remains one of the foremost texts in Yiddish studies? it predates King Arthur, but there have to be other reasons…

(via maximilianofmexico)

18 notes

Illuminated Pentateuch, 11th century.
And Miriam the prophet, sister of Aaron, took a drum in hand; she led all the women in music and in dancing. Miriam responded with the refrain:
Sing to the Lord
Horse and rider
For He is mighty
He cast into the sea.(Ex.15:16f)

Illuminated Pentateuch, 11th century.

And Miriam the prophet, sister of Aaron, took a drum in hand; she led all the women in music and in dancing. Miriam responded with the refrain:

Sing to the Lord

Horse and rider

For He is mighty

He cast into the sea.
(Ex.15:16f)

(Source: huc.edu)

Filed under judaism passover miriam

36 notes

betvous:

foxtrotsky:

miss-michal:

pretentioususernametosoundsmart:

I was so happy that I got to celebrate Passover on Sunday night. Though I am not Jewish, we celebrate Passover ever year at my church (I’m Roman Catholic) by holding a Seder Dinner. I hadn’t been able to attend for three or four years, and I was overjoyed at…

*AGGRESSIVELY VOMITS ON OP*

as an ex-Roman Catholic, I can say that you have zero religious need to celebrate a seder.

the seder as we know it did not come into existence until hundreds of years after Jesus’s death. It has no relevance to your religion, and it’s highly disrespectful of you to have a “Catholic Seder” especially in light of the church’s long history of antisemitism.

Now go in the corner and think about what you’ve done.

Also, while the “last supper” underlies the Eucharist it is the death and resurrection of Christ that is the main tenet of the Catholic faith.  I went through years of formal Catholic education, Easter - the death and Resurrection - was drilled into us as absolutely necessary for Catholicism. In other words, the entirety of the faith and it’s calendar revolves around Easter. 

If you feel so disconnected from Easter you need to appropriate another religion’s holiday you need to revisit the Nicene Creed and talk to your priest. Your crisis of faith doesn’t give you permission to use Judaism to make yourself feel better.

Filed under good 2 know

34 notes

crackedbrain321:

baruchobramowitz:

saltdragon:

fuckyeahsoftzionism:

are pastors and priests really so uncreative, so unable to keep church attendance up, that they have to steal jewish rituals to get congregants excited about church?

Can’t they just do an egg hunt and leave our traditions alone?

Aren’t egg hunts a stolen tradition too?

Yup, from native European religions. 

i wouldn’t say syncretism/adapting to local norms in order to make yourself appealing to the natives is on par with, all of a sudden, practicing a fully-formed jewish ritual. easter eggs have been a thing for hundreds of years; it’s an actual part of christianity. i mean, hell, eggs as a symbol simply belong to many cultures. christians having a seder, on the other hand, seems to be a contemporary phenomenon. 

what i’m saying is, christians doing seders is antisemitism. easter eggs aren’t oppressive. 

Filed under also i hate pagans

36 notes

pretentioususernametosoundsmart:

I was so happy that I got to celebrate Passover on Sunday night. Though I am not Jewish, we celebrate Passover ever year at my church (I’m Roman Catholic) by holding a Seder Dinner. I hadn’t been able to attend for three or four years, and I was overjoyed at the opportunity to celebrate it once more. It’s always such a joyous feast, and I honestly enjoy it more than Easter or Christmas, despite the lack of gifts or gluttony. It’s so simplistic, but everything has meaning to it, from the food we eat, to the words we say, to the candles on our tables. I love celebrating my Jewish roots and rekindling the fire of my faith.

you don’t have any meaningful rituals of your own? why do you have to steal ours? 

120 notes

All the rituals of Passover—what Amichai calls child’s play—do not necessarily communicate the notion of freedom they were devised to transmit. The play can become more uncannily precious than the ideas it is meant to put across. Better to have the smells of the seder meal filling the senses than disturbing ideas about bondage and release into the desert filling the talk; better to be a good Jew than a Jew worrying about how to be good.
Bernard Avishai on the poet Yehuda Amichai’s insight about Passover: http://nyr.kr/1hFygvD (via newyorker)

(Source: newyorker.com, via rubenfeld)