Jew in a Blog

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wwiafrica:

A group of allied Prisoners of War. 8 different nationalities on display: Vietnamese, Tunisian, Senegalese, Sudanese, Russian, American, Portugese, and English on the Western Front.
Such images were used as propaganda by the Germans to illustrate to the German people that they were fighting not only a European war but a war of a global nature, whereby the allies employed their colonial troops, and in spite of this, they(central powers) were making gains.  A tool used to pump up morale amongst the Germans and central powers. 
Original image source: National Archive/Official German Photograph of WWI
More about #WWIAfrica on our website.

wwiafrica:


A group of allied Prisoners of War. 8 different nationalities on display: Vietnamese, Tunisian, Senegalese, Sudanese, Russian, American, Portugese, and English on the Western Front.

Such images were used as propaganda by the Germans to illustrate to the German people that they were fighting not only a European war but a war of a global nature, whereby the allies employed their colonial troops, and in spite of this, they(central powers) were making gains.  A tool used to pump up morale amongst the Germans and central powers. 

Original image source: National Archive/Official German Photograph of WWI

More about #WWIAfrica on our website.

Filed under wwi

45 notes

Everyone suddenly burst out singing;
And I was filled with such delight
As prisoned birds must find in freedom,
Winging wildly across the white
Orchards and dark-green fields; on - on - on - and out of sight.

Everyone’s voice was suddenly lifted;
And beauty came like the setting sun:
My heart was shaken with tears; and horror
Drifted away … O, but Everyone
Was a bird; and the song was wordless; the singing will never be done.

Everyone Sang by Siegfried Sassoon (via zizzerzazzerzuzz)

(via lord-kitschener)

Filed under wwi

22 notes

folksbiene:

"These Israeli and Palestinian Kids Would Rather Sing Than Fight: The YMCA Jerusalem Youth Chorus offers high schoolers sanity in a world gone mad."

They come to the Jerusalem Youth Chorus from as far away as Ramallah (a Palestinian outlook in the occupied West Bank) and a moshav (a Jewish settlement) outside of Jerusalem. They speak Arabic, Hebrew, and often a bit of English. They are five tenors, eight sopranos, six altos, and seven basses. They are 13 Palestinians and 13 Israelis, all high school students. Some are friends of friends with Gilad Shaar, Naftali Frenkel, and Eyal Yifrach, the Israeli teens whose kidnapping and killing sparked the latest round of clashes; others grew up around the corner from Muhammad Khdeir, a 16-year-old Palestinian boy who was murdered in the wake of those kidnappings.

For the past two years, the chorus—the only mixed Israeli-Palestinian choral group in the Holy City—has met weekly in Jerusalem to sing at the international YMCA, one of the few places Arabs and Jews can meet comfortably. This summer, they’ve rehearsed several times a week—despite the rocket launches and airstrikes—in a flurry of preparations for their first international singing tour. It took them last week to Kyoto and Tokyo, where they could enjoy a break from the troubles at home.

Read the full article here.

In the video above, the kids perform “Adinu,” based on a poem by the Sufi mystic Ibn ‘Arahi: “I believe in the religion of love, wherever love is found.”

Filed under most of my content comes from only like three other blogs these days

14 notes

folksbiene:

This looks pretty cool!

This September, TCM proudly presents The Projected Image: The Jewish Experience on Film, a month-long showcase of movies focusing on Jewish history and heritage as portrayed on screen. Airing Tuesdays throughout the month, the showcase will feature introductions by TCM host Robert Osborne and Dr. Eric Goldman, Ph.D. an expert on Yiddish, Israeli and Jewish film and adjunct professor at Yeshiva University. Dr. Goldman is the founder and president of Ergo Media, a distributor of Jewish film. He is also the author of two important books on the topic, The American Jewish Story Through Cinema (2013) and Visions, Images and Dreams: Yiddish Film Past and Present (2011). 

The Projected Image: The Jewish Experience on Film will feature more than 20 films, including four that are coming to the network for the first time. Dr. Goldman assisted in curating the month-long programming event, which is divided into seven different themes. The Jewish Experience on Film will open Sept. 2 with “The Evolving Jew,” which will include two versions of The Jazz Singer – Al Jolson’s early sound film from 1927 [pictured above on the left] and the 1952 remake with Danny Thomas. That same night, "The Immigrant Experience" will look at Jewish families transplanted from Europe to the U.S. and includes Joan Micklin Silver’s Hester Street (1975 [pictured top right]) and Barry Levinson’s nostalgic drama Avalon (1990).

Read more about the film series and see the full schedule on TCM’s site.

Filed under to do dope

1 note

From the Tenement Museum:

Discovered beneath the floorboards during restoration work at 97 Orchard Street, this business card advertises ”Professor Dora Meltzer” as a palm reader in both Yiddish and English. Hymen Meltzer and his wife Bessie, both Russian immigrants who arrived in the U.S. in 1885, resided at 97 Orchard with several young children in 1903-4. While records list no ”Dora” among this particular household, it is possible that Bessie used an alias when advertising her palmistry and mind reading skills. According to the card, ”Dora” Meltzer practiced palmistry out of apartment 4 on the first floor of 97 Orchard Street.

From the Tenement Museum:

Discovered beneath the floorboards during restoration work at 97 Orchard Street, this business card advertises ”Professor Dora Meltzer” as a palm reader in both Yiddish and English. Hymen Meltzer and his wife Bessie, both Russian immigrants who arrived in the U.S. in 1885, resided at 97 Orchard with several young children in 1903-4. While records list no ”Dora” among this particular household, it is possible that Bessie used an alias when advertising her palmistry and mind reading skills. According to the card, ”Dora” Meltzer practiced palmistry out of apartment 4 on the first floor of 97 Orchard Street.